New York University

Information about Physical Therapist program at New York University

 

 

 

New York University (A4, D6, F1, PR)

Last Updated by Program: 03/20/2007
Address:   Department of Physical Therapy
New York University
380 Second Avenue, 4th Floor
New York, NY 10010-5615
Phone:   (212)998-9400
Fax:   (212)995-4190
Web Address:   http://www.nyu.edu/education/pt
PROGRAM DIRECTOR:
Wen Ling, PT, PhD
Chairperson
INSTITUTIONAL INFORMATION:
  Accreditor:   Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools
  Carnegie Classification:   Research Universities (very high research activity)
 
PHYSICAL THERAPY PROGRAM ACCREDITATION:
  Date of Initial Accreditation:   Bachelor’s degree, 1942 (no longer offered) DPT degree, May 1998
  Current Accreditation Status:   Accreditation
  Next Visit   2012
  Five Year History:   Accreditation
 
DEGREE CONFERRED: Doctor of Physical Therapy
CLINICAL EXPERIENCES:
First-year students have one 6-week full-time clinical experience during the summer term. Second-year students have two part-time clinical experiences during the fall and spring term plus one 8-week full-time experience in the summer term. Third-year students have two part-time clinical experiences in the fall and spring term plus one 16-week full-time experience during the summer term. The university is affiliated with over 300 clinical education centers nationally.
 
FACULTY:
There are 11 full-time and 20 part-time faculty members. Seven of the full-time faculty hold post-professional doctoral degrees, two are certified as clinical specialists, and 10 are engaged in clinical practice. Over the past 3 years, the faculty has averaged 0.4 publications in peer-reviewed journals. The faculty to student ratio is 1:8.
 
ENROLLMENT:
Total enrollment at New York University numbers over 60,000 students from mixed cultures, gender, and age. The physical therapy program accepts 25 students each year and a total of 75 students for the three-year professional doctoral program.
 
ADMISSION:
Applicants must have a baccalaureate degree with a minimum of 3.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA) in all undergraduate courses and a minimum 3.0 GPA in the prerequisite natural science courses. Prerequisite courses include: 8 hours of biology, chemistry, and physics; 4 hours of anatomy and physiology; 3 social science courses; 1 hour of physical activity/movement/dance/sports, speech communication, and statistics. A minimum combined score of 1,000 on the verbal and quantitative sections (with a minimum score of 500 on the quantitative section) of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is required. 60% of qualified applicants are admitted to the program. (3-year average).
 
OUTCOMES:
The first class to be awarded the DPT degree from NYU graduated in 2001. All graduates of this class as well as all subsequent graduates (2002, 2003, 2004, 2005 & 2006) (100%) receive job offers within 3 months of graduation. The students' overall licensure pass rate is 100%.
 
TUITION, FEES AND FINANCIAL AID:
The three-year, flat rate tuition for the incoming class of 2007 is $104,000. Room and board from September to May is $15,200. Laboratory and other fees are approximately $600, and books are approximately $721. Additional costs to commuter students vary greatly. For information regarding the types of aid available to qualified students, contact the Office of Financial Aid at 25 West 4th Street, New York, NY 10003 (212-998-4444).
 
STUDENT LIFE:
Advanced degrees at the master and doctoral levels are open to licensed physical therapists. Approximately 50% of New York University (NYU) students live in dormitories at the Washington Square Campus or private apartments near the university. Approximately 50% commute to school and live in one of the five boroughs of New York, Long Island, Westchester and Rockland counties, northern and central New Jersey, or southeastern Connecticut. The main campus at NYU is located at Washington Square (near Broadway and W 4th Street). Most physical therapy classes are held in the "medical/dental/health district" on First Avenue, between 22nd and 34th Streets. Cultural and entertainment activities are diverse and plentiful. Driving and parking private cars in New York City is difficult, time-consuming and not recommended.